Live Updates: La Soufriere Volcano Eruption

Present La Soufrière Alert Level:ORANGEThere is a highly elevated level of seismic and/or fumarolic activity or other unusual activity. An eruption may begin with less than twenty-four hours' notice.

Key Messages:
— The Eruption: An effusive eruption is ongoing at the La Soufrière Volcano. Lava is confined to the crater at this time. Steam and volcanic gases can be seen above the crater. Those living close to the volcano should expect strong sulfur smells for the next several days to weeks, depending on the wind direction. The new dome could overtop the crater and send lava cascading down the volcano in the coming months if the ongoing rate of effusion continues (in approximately 6.5 months as of January 2021).
— Seismicity: There is little seismicity associated with the ongoing eruption. Rockfalls have been detected by the new seismic stations.
— The Alert Level: The alert level is at Orange. An eruption may begin with less than 24 hours’ notice. Persons living in areas close to the volcano which include communities from Fancy to Georgetown and Belle Isle to Richmond are asked to remain alert and listen to all advisories from the National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO).
No evacuation order has been issued for any communities of St. Vincent.
— The public is advised to desist from visiting the volcano and do not interfere with monitoring equipment.
— Official information will originate from St. Vincent and the Grenadines National Emergency Management Organization and the University of the West Indies Seismic Research Center. FAQ‘s have also been addressed by authorities.

La Soufrière Bulletin #13

Montserrat Scientists Arrive, Helicopter Recon & Sample Collection Scheduled

8:00 PM 13th January 2021

Heavy cloud did not allow for aerial reconnaissance today, arrangements have been made for aerial reconnaissance over the next few days via helicopter.

The dome that broke through the crater floor, on December 27, 2020, on the south-west perimeter of the existing dome, continues to grow within the crater of La Soufrière and has an ellipsoid shape with growth expanding in a westerly direction.

Alert level remains at Orange. The volcano continues to exude magma on the surface and steam can still be observed from the Belmont Observatory. Persons living in areas close to the volcano should expect strong sulphur smells for several days to weeks, depending on changes in wind direction.

Scientists from the Montserrat Volcano Observatory arrived this afternoon to support Professor Richard Robertson and the team from the Seismic Research Centre on the monitoring of the La Soufriere volcano

Posted by NEMO St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Thomas Christopher and Dr. Adam Stinton, two scientists from the Seismic Research Centre (SRC) based at the Montserrat Volcano Observatory (MVO) arrived in St. Vincent and the Grenadines today on board the Regional Security Services (RSS) Aircraft. Their main mission will be to gather data from the dome and crater through temperature and photogrammetry and gas measurements using a MultiGAS and spectrometer.

The Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) has finalized helicopter support for the Seismic Research Centre (SRC) Team to install equipment and collect samples from the summit of the volcano.

The United Kingdom FCDO provides funding for a rotary helicopter to support the monitoring of the St. Vincent and the…

Posted by CDEMA – Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency on Wednesday, January 13, 2021

Rotary helicopter aircraft services will be available from Thursday 14th January, 2020. to support access to sampling of the extrusive materials, air lifting equipment to the flanks of the volcano, surveillance/reconnaissance to analyse changes in the volcano and other relevant support to the work of the scientists This service will be provided at a cost of £51,000 through the Memorandum of Understanding on the ‘UK Support for the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) Response Teams programme’.

The National Emergency Management Organisation is reminding the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued.

NEMO continues to appeal to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe to do so.

NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



La Soufrière Bulletin #12

Gradual Dome Growth Continues

8:00 PM 11th January 2021

No reconnaissance flight of the La Soufriere was done today, due to unfavorable weather conditions.

The dome that broke through the crater floor, on December 27, 2020, on the south-west perimeter of the existing dome, continues to grow within the crater of La Soufrière and has an ellipsoid shape with growth expanding in a westerly direction.

The alert level remains at Orange. The volcano continues to exude magma on the surface and steam can still be observed from the Belmont Observatory. Persons living in areas close to the volcano should expect strong sulfur smells for several days to weeks, depending on changes in wind direction.

The SRC Team led a mission on Saturday 9th January, 2021 with the assistance of Drone Pilot Rommel De Freitas, to test the feasibility of using drone for aerial surveillance of the volcano. The mission was successful and it was concluded that useful surveillance work can be done with drones from a particular location at the crater.

Today was very windy and cloudy at the summit but Professor Richard Robertson managed to get a few photos of the growing…

Posted by NEMO St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Saturday, January 9, 2021

The Team completed installation of a seismic station in Owia today and are preparing equipment to be installed at the Summit Station this week and the Fancy Station next week.

The Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) has finalized helicopter support for the Seismic Research Centre (SRC) Team to install equipment and collect samples from the summit of the volcano.

The National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO) has suspended all face to face community meetings to update residents on the present state of La Soufriere Volcano until further notice due to the revised protocols for mass gathering implemented by the Health Services Sub-Committee of NEMO. Information to communities will be communicated virtually.

The National Emergency Management Organisation is reminding the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued.

NEMO continues to appeal to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe to do so.

NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



La Soufrière Bulletin #11

Montserrat Scientists Join SRC Team, CDEMA Finalizing Helicopter Support

8:00 PM 10th January 2021

Weather conditions did not allow for a reconnaissance flight on Saturday 9th January or Sunday 10th January, 2021, however analysis of footage collected from a drone flight over the volcano on Saturday 9th January indicate that the drone continues to grow.

The dome that broke through the crater floor, on December 27, 2020, on the south-west perimeter of the existing dome, continues to grow within the crater of La Soufrière and has an ellipsoid shape with growth expanding in a westerly direction.

The alert level remains at Orange. The volcano continues to exude magma on the surface and steam can still be observed from the Belmont Observatory. Persons living in areas close to the volcano should expect strong sulfur smells for several days to weeks, depending on changes in wind direction.

Two scientists from the Seismic Research Centre (SRC) based at the Montserrat Volcano Observatory (MVO), Dr. Thomas Christopher and Dr. Adam Stinton, will join the current team here in St. Vincent later this week. They are expected to gather data from the dome and crater through temperature and photogrammetry measurements and gas measurements using a MultiGAS and spectrometer.

The Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) is finalising helicopter support for the Seismic Research Centre (SRC) Team to install equipment and collect samples from the summit of the volcano.

The SRC Team commenced installation of Seismic station in Owia today and will continue installation in Fancy and areas closer to the volcano during the course of this week.

Installation of a GPS station at Georgetown was successful, with a total of three stations currently streaming data to SRC.

The continuing hotspot anomaly being recorded by NASA FIRMS results from the presence of the new dome. Satellite imagery obtained through the Monitoring Unrest from Space (MOUNTS) Project indicate that the dome is detectable by orbiting earth satellites.

The National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO) has suspended all face to face community meetings to update residents on the present state of La Soufriere Volcano until further notice due to the revised protocols for mass gathering implemented by the Health Services Sub-Committee of NEMO. Information to communities will be communicated virtually.

The National Emergency Management Organisation is reminding the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued.

NEMO continues to appeal to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe to do so.

NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



La Soufrière Bulletin #10

Dome Expands Westward As Eruption Continues

8:00 PM 8th January 2021

The dome that broke through the crater floor, on December 27, 2020, on the south-west perimeter of the existing dome continues to grow within the crater of La Soufrière and has an ellipsoid shape with growth expanding in a westerly direction.

The SRC Team spent the day preparing equipment for deployment. The Team also completed a visual observation of the mountain, which included observation of the emission of gas, taking still photos and videos, as these will help to determine the location to place instruments to monitor the flow of gas.

A reconnaissance mission to Fancy and Owia to identify suitable locations for the installation of additional seismic stations was done today. Seismic data from the Wallibou station is now streaming into the Seismic Research Centre (SRC).

A webcam providing live feed was installed on January 3, 2021, at the Belmont Observatory. A second camera, at Georgetown, was successfully installed and Camera and weather station installations, at the summit, are still being pursued.

In preparation for the installation of stations at the summit, seismic and ground deformation monitoring equipment are being mobilized to Georgetown to facilitate easier movement of equipment for deployment to the sites identified on the volcano.

The alert level remains at Orange. The volcano continues to exude magma on the surface, and steam can still be observed from the Belmont Observatory. Persons living in areas close to the volcano should expect strong sulfur smells for several days to weeks, depending on wind direction changes.

The National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO) met with residents of Sandy Bay and surrounding communities on Thursday 7th January 2021 at the Sandy Bay Government School to update residents on the present situation at the La Soufrière Volcano and to review the Community Volcano Emergency Plan.

Image may contain: text that says 'invites commurity members and leaders to our meetinas ANCELLED ED In light of the current increase in COVID 19 positive cases, the National Emergency Management Organisation has cancelled all scheduled and planned physical community meetings. Please stay tuned for further announcements on virtual meetings as we continue our preparations in the current multi-hazard environment.'

The Community Meeting slated to take place on Saturday 9th January 2021 at the Georgetown Secondary School at 3:00 p.m. has been canceled due to the revised protocols for mass gathering implemented by the Health Services Sub-Committee of the National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO).

The National Emergency Management Organisation reminds the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued. NEMO continues to appeal to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe. NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



Image Of Mt. Kelud, Indonesia Purported To Be La Soufriere – SRC Responds

5:45 PM 8th January 2021

The UWI SRC is advising the public to avoid sharing unverified images that don’t originate from the SRC or NEMO concerning the La Soufriere Volcano in St. Vincent.

Posted by NEMO St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Friday, January 8, 2021


La Soufrière Bulletin #9

Steam, Sulfur Smells To Continue For Days to Weeks As Dome Grows

1:00 PM 7th January 2021

Vincentian Geologist Prof. Richard Robertson, leader of the Team from the Seismic Research Centre, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus (UWI-SRC), briefed Cabinet on the current status of the La Soufriere Volcano on Wednesday 6th January 2021.

The SRC Team conducted a successful reconnaissance of the La Soufriere Volcano on board the French Helicopter on Wednesday 6th January 2021 through an arrangement between the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines and the Government of France, through the Embassy of France to the Eastern Caribbean States, to Barbados and the OECS in Saint Lucia. The second planned reconnaissance on that day onboard the Regional Security System (RSS) Aircraft was canceled due to heavy cloud cover when the aircraft arrived.

The alert level remains at Orange. The volcano continues to exude magma on the surface, steam can still be observed from the Belmont Observatory, and the new dome also continues to increase in size. Persons living in areas close to the volcano should expect strong sulfur smells for several days to weeks, depending on wind direction changes.

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The National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO) will be meeting with residents of Sandy Bay and surrounding communities at 3:00 PM today at the Sandy Bay Government School to update residents on the present situation at the La Soufriere Volcano and to review the Community Volcano Emergency Plan.

On Saturday 9th January 2021, NEMO will meet with Georgetown residents and surrounding areas at the Georgetown Secondary School at 3:00 PM to update residents on the present situation at the La Soufriere Volcano and to review the Community Volcano Emergency Plan.
The National Emergency Management Organisation reminds the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued.
NEMO continues to appeal to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe to do so.
NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



New Images of La Soufriere’s Growing Dome

6th January 2021

UWI SRC’s Professor Richard Robertson and the team visited La Soufriere’s summit on Tuesday morning. Scientific excursion to the volcano summit was conducted in a controlled environment inclusive of volcano monitoring safety equipment. The volcano poses a significant danger to those at the crater rim. Public access to the volcano is restricted.

Images: Professor Richard Robertson

Mr. Lloyd Lynch, Instrumentation Engineer at the UWI SRC, was aboard a helicopter flyover of La Soufriere on Wednesday, January 5th. The team also scouted possible new seismic station sites to monitor the latest activity better. Plans are underway to install cameras at the crater rim for scientific observation. The helicopter flight was arranged between the Government of SVG and the Government of France, through the Embassy of France to the Eastern Caribbean States, to Barbados, and the OECS in Saint Lucia.



La Soufrière Bulletin #8

New Dome Increased In Size

8:00 PM 5th January 2021

The team from The Seismic Research Centre, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus (UWI-SRC) led by Vincentian Geologist Prof. Richard Robertson installed a monitoring station at Wallibou today. They made a trip to the crater rim to take still photos and videos, which will allow them to estimate the volume of material extruded and the growth of the new dome. Based on observations today, the dome is slowly getting bigger.

Images of the new lava dome in the La Soufriere Volcano on the 5th January 2020, taken by UWI SRC staff as equipment was installed on the crater rim. (UWI SRC)

The SRC Team will also conduct a reconnaissance of the La Soufriere Volcano on board the French Helicopter on Wednesday 6th January 2020 through an arrangement between the Government of St. Vincent and the Grenadines and the Government of France, through the Embassy of France to the Eastern Caribbean States, to Barbados and the OECS in Saint Lucia.

The Regional Security System (RSS) Aircraft will also do a surveillance of the La Soufriere Volcano on Wednesday 6th January, 2021.

Aerial reconnaissance of La Soufriere was done today, however thick cloud cover was blocking the view of the new dome.

The alert level remains at Orange. The Volcano continues to exude magma on the surface, and steam can still be observed from the Belmont Observatory. Persons living in areas close to the volcano should expect strong sulfur smells for several days to weeks, depending on wind direction changes.

The National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO) held three (3) community meetings today with residents of Fancy, Owia, Point, and Calliaqua to provide an update on the present situation at the La Soufriere Volcano, conduct a review of the Community Volcano Emergency Plans. Also, residents of Calliaqua were briefed on their roles as it relates to receiving persons who will be evacuated if it becomes necessary.

There will also be a meeting with residents of Sandy Bay and surrounding communities on Thursday 7th January 2021 at 3:00 p.m. at the Sandy Bay Government School to update residents on the present situation at the La Soufriere Volcano and to review the Community Volcano Emergency Plan.

On Saturday 9th January 2021, NEMO will meet with residents of Georgetown and surrounding areas at the Georgetown Secondary School at 3:00 p.m. to update residents on the present situation at the La Soufriere Volcano and to review the Community Volcano Emergency Plan.

The National Emergency Management Organisation reminds the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued. NEMO continues to appeal to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe. NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



La Soufrière Bulletin #7

Community Meetings Underway For La Soufrière Emergency Plans

8:00 PM 4th January 2021

No aerial reconnaissance of La Soufriere was done today due to the heavy cloud cover.

Alert level remains at Orange. The Volcano continues to exude magma on the surface, and steam can still be observed from the Belmont Observatory. Persons living in areas close to the volcano should expect strong sulfur smells for several days to weeks, depending on wind direction changes.

Thermal anomaly of La Soufriere's new lava dome, detected by Sentinel @ Satellite (MOUNTS)
Thermal anomaly of La Soufriere’s new lava dome, detected by Sentinel @ Satellite (MOUNTS)

The team from The Seismic Research Centre, University of the West Indies, St. Augustine Campus (UWI-SRC) led by Vincentian Geologist Prof. Richard Robertson spent the day preparing, assembling, and testing equipment to be installed at the Wallilabou Station on Tuesday 5th January 2021 to improve the Monitoring Network System.

The Director of NEMO briefed Opposition Members of Parliament today on the current situation at La Soufriere.

The National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO) will meet with Fancy, Owia, and Point residents on Tuesday 5th January 2021. The first meeting will be held at the Fancy Government School at 1:00 p.m. Residents of Owia and Point will meet at the Owia Government School from 4:00 p.m. Residents will be updated on the present situation at the La Soufriere Volcano and conduct a review of the Community Volcano Emergency Plan.

NEMO will also meet with residents of Calliaqua and surrounding areas to provide an update on the present situation at the La Soufriere Volcano and to put plans in place to receive persons if evacuation becomes necessary.

There will also be a meeting with residents of Sandy Bay and surrounding communities on Thursday 7th January 2021 at 3:00 p.m. at the Sandy Bay Government School to update residents on the present situation at the La Soufriere Volcano and to review the Community Volcano Emergency Plan.

On Saturday 9th January 2021, NEMO will meet with residents of Georgetown and surrounding areas at the Georgetown Secondary School at 3:00 p.m. to update residents on the present situation at the La Soufriere Volcano and to review the Community Volcano Emergency Plan.

The National Emergency Management Organisation is reminding the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued.

NEMO continues to appeal to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe to do so.

NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



New Dome Growing, Can Overtop Crater In 6.5 Months

3rd January 2021

The growing lava dome in the crater of La Soufrière this morning. Aerial flight observations continue, when possible, over the crater to track changes to the growing dome. The volcano continues to be dangerous, and the public is advised to avoid the area.

This effusive eruption could overtop the crater and send molten lava cascading down the volcano in the coming months if the ongoing rate of effusion continues. Dr. Erouscilla Joseph of the UWI Seismic Research Center explained, “there is a little lip on the crater and where the dome is growing. It is close to that lip. If the volume of material is large enough to spill over that lip, there is the potential for the material to flow down the flacks of the volcano and then, of course, affect people.”

Based on very crude data from aerial reconnaissance, the UWI SRC estimates that 700,000 cubic meters of magma have erupted to date. Joseph stressed the estimate’s uncertainty, but it will take approximately six and a half months to cross the crater rim if the current effusion rate continues. However, the La Soufriere volcano is a dynamic system and changes daily.

Speaking on state radio Saturday 2nd January, Professor Richard Robertson, head of the UWI Seismic Research Center’s team in St. Vicent, said the new dome is expanding further west of the 1979 dome and is growing in size.

He said as the dome, or the black rock that persons would have seen in videos, is incandescent and will glow at night. “It is what we expected, and once effusion starts at La Soufriere, it can continue for several weeks or months.”

From October 1971 to March 1972, lava was quietly extruded inside the mile-wide crater. The eruption was largely effusive and resulted in the emergence of a steep-sided island.

Sentinel 2 overpass of the La Soufriere Volcano on the 3rd January 2021 showing the short-wave infrared (SWIR) hotspot on the growing lava dome. (CopernicusEU/PlanetLabs)

Robertson stated if the La Soufriere were to have explosive eruption ash can reach east to Barbados and even further. The 1979 eruptions were so powerful ash fell on Barbados, 180 km to the east, on the afternoons of 13 and April.

At each eruption, the mushrooming clouds reached up to 8,000 feet and were readily visible from Kingstown. Each explosion was followed by the deposition of a thin layer of ash over the entire island, heavier in the northern part.

“ Unfortunately I don’t have good news for Vincentians, given the historical nature of the La Soufriere, and because of such, we have to remain on high alert”, Professor Robertson continued.

Robertson said the volcano can go from effusive to explosive in a very short time, and we are very uncertain how long that time is”.

Sentinel 2 overpass of the La Soufriere Volcano on the 3rd January 2021 showing the growing lava dome via visible satellite imagery. (CopernicusEU/PlanetLabs)

At dawn, on the 13th of April 1979, the La Soufriere Volcano in northern St. Vincent erupted. Six hours earlier, the Government of St. Vincent had been warned that a highly abnormal situation existed and that an eruption was likely in the coming hours.

One of the things Robertson said they do when monitoring gives the authorities as much time as they can. However, since there is no guarantee, people need to listen to the official sources for information.



La Soufrière Bulletin #6

No Evacuations Ordered For St. Vincent

1:00 PM January 3rd 2021

A view of the growing dome today – Sunday 3rd January, 2021 Photo credits: Jason Veira

Posted by NEMO St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Sunday, January 3, 2021

The National Emergency Management Organization wishes to advise all citizens and residents of St. Vincent and The Grenadines that no evacuation order has been issued to any section of the population. Several media outlets, both locally and abroad, have published false information to this effect. These reports are inaccurate and misleading.

Growing dome at La Soufriere captured by Jason Viera on the 3rd January 2021

NEMO reminds all citizens and residents to ensure that any information regarding the La Soufriere Volcano and the current emergency are from credible and official sources only. In this regard, the official sources of information are the NEMO and the UWI Seismic Research Center (SRC). We continue to monitor the ongoing activity at the La Soufriere volcano with assistance from the team of experts from the UWI SRC, lead by Professor Richard Robertson, and would update the nation of any change in status as soon as this occurs.



La Soufrière Bulletin #5

Camera Installed To Continuously Monitor Volcano, Eruption Continues

8:00 PM 2nd January 2021

The team from The Seismic Research Centre, University of the West Indies St. Augustine Campus (UWI-SRC) led by Vincentian Geologist Prof. Richard Robertson continued work to upgrade the Volcano Monitoring System today. A Web Cam Monitoring System was installed at Rose Hall to monitor the summit of the Volcano constantly. A Data Centre was also established at the Observatory at Belmont to analyze the volcano data. The team also conducted an alternate site exploration today at Fancy and other areas to identify new sites where equipment will be installed.

Director NEMO, Michelle Forbes and Professor Richard Robertson will participate in the WE FM Issue at Hand Radio Programme on Sunday 3rd January, 2021 at 10:30 a.am. Professor Robertson will participate via telephone.

The North Leeward District Disaster Committees met last Wednesday, December 30, 2020, to sensitize members of the communities and review the Volcano Emergency Plans developed in 2019 in preparation for the Trade Winds Exercise. During this meeting, the committee members revisited the rendezvous point and the vulnerable person’s database.

The North Windward District Disaster Committees will meet next week to sensitize the members of the communities and to update their community evacuation plans.

The Director of NEMO will brief the Opposition Members of Parliament on Monday 4th January, 2021 at 10:30 a.m.

Richard Robertson and Ms. Michelle Forbes will appear on VC3 programme Round Table Talk on Wednesday 6th January, 2021.

No aerial reconnaissance was done today as a result of the high wind advisory currently in effect for St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

Alert level remains at Orange. The Volcano continues to exude magma on the surface, and steam can still be observed from the Belmont Observatory. Persons living in areas close to the volcano should expect strong sulfur smells for several days to weeks, depending on wind direction changes.

The National Emergency Management Organisation is reminding the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued.

NEMO is also appealing to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe to do so.

NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



Rosebank Residents Report Strong Sulphur SmellNews784

1st January 2021

 The strong smell of sulphur is being reported by residents in the northwestern community of Rosebank on Friday night.

Rosebank and several other communities are located in the direct path of the La Soufriere volcano.

A number of residents in Rosebank reported to News784 that the smell of sulphur has been in the atmosphere since last week, however, it became extremely strong on Friday night.

One woman told News784, “the strong scent of the sulfur is becoming Unbearable making you feel nauseated, it’s burning my eyes and makes the throat feel funny.” She said the wearing of the mask makes no difference.

Rosebank is among communities that will have to be evacuated if an eruption takes place.



La Soufrière Bulletin #4

UWI SRC Deploys Equipment. Eruption Continues With Steam & Magma

6:00 PM 1st January 2021

The alert level remains at Orange. The Volcano continues to exude magma on the surface, and steam can still be observed from the Belmont Observatory. Persons living in areas close to the volcano, which include communities from Fancy to Georgetown and Belle Isle to Richmond, are asked to remain alert and listen to all advisories from the National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO).

The three-person team from The University of the West Indies St. Augustine Campus (UWI-SRC) began work today, having arrived in St. Vincent yesterday, to provide scientific support for the ongoing eruption at La Soufriѐre volcano. Led by Vincentian Geologist Prof. Richard Robertson, the team spent most of today, Friday, January 1, re-inspecting and upgrading all the seismic sites. A new GPS station was also installed at Georgetown. This new station will be able to detect signals from the volcano. Over the next few days, work will focus on upgrading and installing other monitoring sites.

Professor Richard Robertson and Ian Juman from the UWI Seismic Research Centre installing a new GPS station at…

Posted by NEMO St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Friday, January 1, 2021

No aerial reconnaissance was done today as a result of the high wind advisory currently in effect for St. Vincent and the Grenadines.

The National Emergency Management Organisation is reminding the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued.

NEMO is also appealing to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe to do so.

NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



La Soufrière Bulletin #3

UWI SRC Team Arrives In St. Vincent, Dome Continues To Grow

6:00 PM 31st December 2020

A three-person team from The University of the West Indies St. Augustine Campus (UWI-SRC) arrived in St. Vincent this morning on board the Regional Security System (RSS) aircraft to provide scientific support for the ongoing eruption at La Soufriѐre volcano. They are Geologist Prof. Richard Robertson, Instrumentation Engineer Lloyd Lynch, and Engineering Technician Ian Juman.

We welcome the team from the Seismic Research Centre to St. Vincent. They arrived at the Argyle International Airport this morning.

Posted by NEMO St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Thursday, December 31, 2020

Two Aerial reconnaissance were done today. The first was done by the group of scientists on board the Regional Security System (RSS) aircraft while en route to St. Vincent and the Grenadines for a first-hand view of activities at the La Soufriere Volcano before landing at the Argyle International Airport (AIA). However, heavy cloud cover prevented them from getting a good view of the crater.

Second attempt at aerial surveillance today 31st December, 2020 confirms continued effusive eruption as new dome is…

Posted by NEMO St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Thursday, December 31, 2020

The second Aerial reconnaissance was done at 4:00 p.m. and the photographer was able to capture photos of the crater, which show that the effusive eruption continues and the new dome also continues to increase in size.

The public is reminded that when the magma interacts with the surface temperature, especially in mornings when the air is cool, it appears as steam, which may be seen above the crater. Similar activities may continue for weeks or months.

The alert level remains at Orange. Persons living in areas close to the volcano, which include communities from Fancy to Georgetown and Belle Isle to Richmond, are asked to remain alert and listen to all advisories from the National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO).

The National Emergency Management Organisation is reminding the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued.

NEMO is also appealing to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe to do so.

NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



2,000 Beds Available At St George’s, Grenada In Case Of Eruption

31st December 2021

The  island Grenada is willing to offer a number of Vincentian’s a place stay if evacuation becomes necessary.

St Vincent and the Grenadines is facing much uncertainty as to what will unfold in the days ahead, as the La Soufriere volcano is currently in an effusive state.

Prime Minister Dr. Keith Mitchell, who attended an emergency meeting, pledged Grenada’s willingness to collaborate with St. George’s University to make available up to 2,000 beds on the campus if an eruption of the volcano creates the need for Vincentians to evacuate.

The Prime Minister has also indicated that Grenada will offer any other support that it can, within its limited means, to assist the people of St. Vincent and the Grenadines.



La Soufrière Bulletin #2

Eruption Continues, Steam Seen Above Crater

10:00 AM 31st December 2020

There has been no explosive eruption of the La Soufriere Volcano overnight. La Soufriere continues to have effusive eruptions, and magma continues to reach the surface at high temperatures. When the magma interacts with the surface temperature, especially in the mornings when the air is cool, it appears as steam, which can then be seen above the crater. Similar activities may continue for weeks or months.

The group of Scientists from the Seismic Research Centre, University of the West Indies St. Augustine Campus led by Vincentian Professor Richard Robertson has departed Port of Spain for St Vincent onboard the Regional Security System (RSS) Aircraft.  The Scientists will do a flyover of the La Soufriere Volcano for a first- hand view of activities there before landing at the AIA.

UWI Seismic Research Centre Deploys Scientific Team to St. Vincent. A three-person team from The UWI Seismic Research…

Posted by UWI Seismic Research Centre on Thursday, December 31, 2020

The alert level remains at Orange. Persons living in areas close to the volcano, which include communities from Fancy to Georgetown and Belle Isle to Richmond, are asked to remain alert and listen to all advisories from the National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO).

The National Emergency Management Organisation is reminding the public that no evacuation order or notice has been issued.

NEMO is also appealing to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe to do so.

NEMO will continue to provide regular updates on all activities taking place at La Soufriere.



La Soufrière Bulletin #1

Dome Increases In Size, Magma Continues To Ooze

6:00 PM 30th December 2020

Monitoring of the La Soufriere volcano continues with aerial surveillance captured by the Soufriere Monitoring Unit on…

Posted by NEMO St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Wednesday, December 30, 2020

An Aerial reconnaissance conducted today Wednesday, December 30 indicates that there are no significant changes at the La Soufriere Volcano since Tuesday, December 29th, 2020. Magma continues to ooze to the surface and the dome has increased in size.

The Executive Committee of the National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO), which comprises Technical Officers from the various government Departments, Private Sector, and Non- Governmental Organizations met today at NEMO’s Conference Room to activate plans if the level of seismicity increases and evacuation becomes necessary.

The Caribbean Disaster Emergency Management Agency (CDEMA) has activated the Regional Coordination Plan as per the protocol which corresponds to the Orange Volcano Hazard Alert Level.

Volcanic hazard map for the La Soufriere Volcano (UWI SRC/NEMO)
Volcanic hazard map for the La Soufriere Volcano (UWI SRC/NEMO)

In keeping with the usual preparatory arrangements for potential hazard impact responses, the CDEMA Coordinating Unit has placed the following Regional Response Mechanism (RRM) Teams on ALERT:

  • CARICOM Disaster Assessment and Coordination (CDAC)
  • CARICOM Operational Support Team (COST)
  • Rapid Needs Assessment Team (RNAT)
  • Caribbean Disaster Relief Unit (CDRU)

A group of Scientists from the Seismic Research Centre, University of the West Indies St. Augustine Campus led by Vincentian Professor Richard Robertson will arrive in St. Vincent and the Grenadines on Thursday 31st  December 2020 onboard the Regional Security System (RSS) Aircraft.  The Scientists will install instruments to strengthen the monitoring mechanism System so that more accurate and timelier scientific advisory on the activities at the La Soufriere Volcano can be provided. 

The alert level remains at Orange. Persons living in areas close to the volcano, which include communities from Fancy to Georgetown and Belle Isle to Richmond, are asked to remain alert and listen to all advisories from the National Emergency Management Organisation (NEMO).

The National Emergency Management Organisation is once again reminding the public that no evacuation order or notice has been given.

NEMO is also appealing to the public to desist from visiting the La Soufriere Volcano until the scientists advise that it is safe to do so.

UPDATE (30/12/2020, 5:39pm AST). There have been no significant changes in activity at La Soufriere volcano since the…

Posted by UWI Seismic Research Centre on Wednesday, December 30, 2020


La Soufrière Volcano Alert Level Raised To Orange

7:00 PM 29th December 2020

NEMO raised the alert level of the La Soufrière Volcano to Orange. This meant that there are highly elevated levels of seismicity or fumarolic activity, or both. Eruptions may occur with less than 24 hours notice.

La Soufrière Volcano's Alert Level is at Orange. (UWI SRC/NEMO)
La Soufrière Volcano’s Alert Level is at Orange. (UWI SRC/NEMO)


UWI SRC, St. Vincent Prime Minister Addresses Nation

4:00 PM 29th December 2020

The UWI SRC, NEMO and the Government of St. Vincent provided an update to the nation on the La Soufrière eruption. At this point, the alert level was raised to orange.


La Soufrière Erupts

2:00 PM December 29th 2020

The St. Vincent and the Grenadines National Emergency Management Organization and the University of the West Indies Seismic Research Center received reports of volcanic activity at the La Soufrière Volcano.

The UWI-SRC has received reports of activity in St Vincent that may be related to La Soufriere volcano. We are currently…

Posted by UWI Seismic Research Centre on Tuesday, December 29, 2020

A small lava dome with fresh magma can be seen here as a black mound at the base of the existing dome in the crater at…

Posted by UWI Seismic Research Centre on Wednesday, December 30, 2020


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